Copacabana. Beach time

Peru / Bolivia

by | May 18, 2016

July 10-12

We set out for Copacabana, a resort town on Lake Titicaca, the highest lake in the world at over 12K feet…and it’s HUGE.  Unfortunately Taylor’s knee is still acting up so we take a bus for $5 ea. This feels like a good choice as it is nearly a 3K ft climb out of La Paz up to El Alto then onto a main throughway populated by buses. Because the road connects the main city of La Paz to a main tourist city only 3.5 hrs away, the road is busy and we are fine with sitting on the bus. We arrive in Copacabana around 1pm and find a beautiful resort, with sunny skies. We take a stroll around, find a hostal, and quickly meet a terrific Dutch couple who invite us to enjoy happy hour with them. We continue our discussion with them into dinner. The hostal is lovely with views overlooking the lake. It’s easily the nicest place that we have stayed.  The next morning we take a tour boat over to Isla del Sol and hike around for the day. The island peaks at over 4000m and there are no autos on the island. It is definitely a tourist island but not many people are seen once leaving the dock area.  We begin about a 90 climb up a series of steps and paths.  There is a little village of permanent residents. Hiking about at the top of the island, I cannot tell which is bluer…the skis or the water.  We find a place selling beer and stop for a moment to enjoy before trekking on and playing with the donkeys and alpacas…both of which are abundant.

We arrive back at the hostal at 4, head back to the same restaurant, then pack it in with the plan to leave in the morning for Puno…and the PERU BORDER!

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Copacabana

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Hiking around Isla del Sol.  Always time for cerveza

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Views from Isla del Sol.  Ominous mountains of Bolivia loom…

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An ass and a donkey.  Taylor knows how to sweet talk the locals.

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You talkin’ to me?

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Always encountering beautiful people

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